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Short-Term Evenity Use Highly Effective in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Primary Osteoporosis

Evenity may represent new treatment option for individuals with RA and osteoporosis

Short-term use of Evenity (romosozumb) is highly effective for patients with osteoporosis, including those with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and primary osteoporosis, according to recent study.

Sclerostin is a protein that is a negative regulator of bone formation that is secreted by osteocytes, that decreases the stimulus for bone-forming cells, osteoblasts. Evenity is an antibody directed against sclerostin, promoting the formation of bone. This category of antibody is a new form of therapy for osteoporosis.

Evenity was approved for the treatment of osteoporosis based on a study of 7180 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis of the total hip or femoral neck were randomized to monthly injection of 210 mg of Evenity or placebo for 12 months.

At 12 months, new vertebral fractures occurred in 16 of 3321 patients (0.5%) in the Evenity group and 59 of 3322 (1,8%) of the placebo group. Nonvertebral fractures occurred in 56 of 3589 (1.6%) in Evenity treated patients compared to 75 of 3591 (2.1%) in the control group. After 1 year, each group was placed on denosumab. Fractures were less at 2 years in the Evenity versus placebo group.2

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In a small group of 26 patients with osteoporosis or rheumatoid arthritis Evenity improved bone density without negatively impacting the RA and the researchers concluded, “Short-term clinical efficacy of Evenity for RA and osteoporosis and primary osteoporosis was extremely effective and has the high potential to be an important option in the treatment of osteoporosis.”

References

  1. Kanayama Y. Short-term of clinical efficacy of Evenity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and primary osteoporosis. Presented at: ASBMR 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting; September 11-15, 2020; Abstract #P-6800
  2. Cosman F, et al: Romosozumba Treatment in Postmenopausal Women with Osteoporosis. N Engl J Med 2016:375:1532-1543